Baltimore, Maryland Passenger Lists, 1891-1943
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Baltimore, Maryland Passenger Lists, 1891-1943
1,154,030記錄
Comprised of the passenger manifests of ships arriving at Baltimore, Maryland, from 1891 through 1948. Information available varies due to significant changes to immigration laws during the span of this collection. The most common information available includes the passenger’s name, sex, age, date of arrival, and name of the ship. More detailed passenger manifests collected additional information including marital status, birth information (date and location), nationality, last residence, home city, port of departure, as well as the names and addresses of family members in the United States and home country. Comprised of NARA publication T844.<br><br><p>The city of Baltimore was the second-leading port of entry for European immigrants after New York City. The popularity of Baltimore was due, in large part, to two related factors: Baltimore’s geographic location and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O).</p><br><p>Baltimore was the most westward of all US ports prior to the completion of the Saint Lawrence Seaway in 1959. Immigrants could sail into Baltimore and then easily continue on to other parts of the interior United States. This route proved to be so popular that only 15% of the immigrants who arrived in Baltimore became permanent residents of the city. The remaining 85% of immigrants continued on to other destinations such as Cincinnati or Chicago.</p><br><p>The primary driving force behind immigration in Baltimore was the B&O Railroad. In 1868, the B&O Railroad partnered with the North German Lloyd shipping line to provide regular service between Baltimore and the German port of Bremen. Ships full of goods delivered by B&O would sail for Bremen, unload their cargo, and then return to Baltimore carrying passengers.</p><br><p>Passengers sailing from Bremen could purchase a single ticket that included both the transatlantic crossing and the B&O Railroad. After docking at the B&O Immigration terminal, passengers with a through-ticket would disembark and immediately board a train to continue their journey inland.<p><br><p>Beginning in 1869, several passenger services subsidized a large boarding house near the immigration terminal in Locust Point. The boarding house was run by a Mrs. Augusta Koether, who was paid &#36;0.75 per day for each immigrant she housed and fed. The address of the boarding house, 107 Beachdale Road, can be found as the US address on the immigration documents of tens of thousands of immigrants.</p><br><p>The direct connection with Bremen made Baltimore a popular destination for German immigrants. By the 1920’s, one in four Baltimore residents spoke German fluently and schools offered classes in both German and English. Opened in 1904, the German Immigrant House offered transitional housing to new immigrants. It was subsidized in part by the German government and primarily housed German immigrants but was open to all. The Immigrant House hosted immigrants until the beginning of World War I. Following World War I, strict immigration quotas significantly reduced the number of immigrants arriving in the United States. However, the cultural influence of German immigrants was felt for decades to come. The final German-printed newspaper in Baltimore was not discontinued until 1976.</p>
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